Posted by: r.m. | April 23, 2010

football… and economic apartheid

Already, on high-traffic intersections, large flags of foreign countries are being sold in Lebanon. Brazil. Germany. Argentina. Italy.

I shrug. Isn’t it a bit early for World Cup fever? And what are we actually getting excited about? Is football (or soccer, as they call it in the US) still just a marvelous game, or has the business of the game, the industry of the business of the game, overshadowed the skill of the players? More importantly, what else has the football business industry overshadowed…

John Pilger has an excellent article entitled Why Sharks Should Not Own Sport.  Read it if you enjoy the game. Read it if you care about human rights.

Here’s an excerpt…

Take for example FIFA, which has effectively taken charge of South Africa for the World Cup. Along with the International Olympic Committee, FIFA is sport’s Wall Street and Pentagon combined. They have this power because host politicians believe the “international prestige” of their visitation will bring economic and promotional benefits, especially to themselves. I was reminded of this watching a documentary by the South African director Craig Tanner, Fahrenheit 2010. His film is not opposed to the World Cup, but reveals how ordinary South Africans, whose game is football, have been shoved aside, dispossessed and further impoverished so that a giant TV façade can be erected in their country.

A new stadium near Nelspruit will host four World Cup matches over 10 days. Jimmy Mohlala, speaker of the local municipality, was gunned down in his home in January last year after whistle-blowing “irregularities” in the tenders. An entire school, which was in the way, has been removed into prefabricated, sweltering steel boxes on a desolate site with a road running through it.  “When the World Cup is over,” said the writer Ashwin Desai, “it will become obvious that these stadiums are going to be empty shells, that our money has been used for what is really a pyramid scheme”.

A community of 20,000 people, the Joe Slovo Informal Settlement, is threatened with eviction from where they live near the main motorway between Cape Town and the city’s airport. They are deemed an “eyesore”. Street vendors will be arrested if they fail to comply with FIFA rules about trade and advertising and mention the words “World Cup”, even “2010”. FIFA will earn about two and quarter billion pounds from the TV rights, exceeding its income from the last two World Cups combined.

Incredibly, South Africa will get none of this. And this is country with up to 40 per cent unemployment, a male life expectancy of 49 and thousands of malnourished children. This truth about the “rainbow nation” is not what fans all over the world will see on their TV screens, although they may glimpse an unreported feature of modern South Africa, which is a vibrant, rolling resistance that has linked the World Cup to an economic apartheid that remains as divisive as ever. Indeed, another kind of World Cup for effective popular protest has long been won in the streets of South Africa’s townships.


Responses

  1. even sports are now run by big business companies!
    this article made me think of all the flags that will be throw on the roads starting now and until the world cup ends(in 2 months :S). with the municipal elections coming next month, leading to a huge number of thrown photos, what a great year for garbage!


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