Posted by: r.m. | November 8, 2013

more news of drought in the Levant

You have probably already read about Syria’s drought — a drought that some argue (a bit too simplistically) contributed to the uprising in Syria.

Well, here’s news about Jordan’s drought.

In both cases – as is usually the case – climate change serves a threat multiplier, exacerbating the current environmental (and economic) problems.

excerpt:

Among the driest countries in the world, Jordan has an average of 145 cubic metres of water available per person annually (the water poverty line is 500 cubic metres). Its average annual precipitation is 111 millimetres.

Prime areas for agricultural cultivation, such as rain-fed areas, are shrinking, in part because of urbanisation and development. Between 1975 and 2007, according to research by Dr. Awni Taimeh from the University of Jordan, grain-cultivating areas decreased by 65 percent and vegetable-cultivating areas by 91 percent.

Farmers in Abu Waleed’s area have meanwhile noticed changes in weather in recent years. Along with a decrease in rainfall, temperatures have risen, leading to more pests and bugs and shifting growing seasons.

full article available here: Jordan’s Farmers Struggle to Weather Climate Change


Responses

  1. What is intriguing about this aritcle is that this issue is not limited to one region or country. In fact, it encompasses many other parts of the world including my country. Climate change as is revealed by this article is debasing the crops widely. I believe the main issue in this article is the incoordination of the government to find solutions immediately. Knowing the change in climate directly affects the quantity of water (rain) and the temperature rise in Jordan (or other) and indirectly affects us (homo sapiens), brisk plots should be adopted by the government and local people. This article is one live example of many others that reveals how rapidly climate change is “evading” our planet and how slowly we are reacting to this anthropogenic act. We will probably be witnessing worse consequences, yet the question remains, what will the government take as actions and when? Will THEY wake up?

  2. Jad Ghantous A1210451 BIo203
    This article is truly interesting because it reveals a much clearer down side to climate change which was correlated with the decreasing of crop productivity in the cases of Abou Walid and Abu Yazan.Something surely needs to be done by their government to assist them with their struggling. However, as they said before, climate change actually affected productivity on so many levels and has decreased the quality of their crops.So, Unless their governments can actually twist time around to turn to a near pollution free no climate change environment,I think it is only fair to cover their losses in one way or another.

  3. Droughts have throughout the history disrupted the economic grounds of the country which has further led to a shortage in alternatives to be taken to counter the effect of droughts. Moreover, the droughts are extending in our region and according to the article have had Syria and Jordan on the list. Such a drop in crop yields would certainly lead to certain inflations and would further widen the gap when the prices of the material needed to well treat the land would go up. The government of Jordan, I believe needs to address the issue very wisely using the experience of international experts if possible so to find a way to amend the bitter drought the country has suffered from.

  4. Marianne Bersaoui BIOL207
    In fact, we are feeling the consequences of climate change not only in Jordan but worldwide including Lebanon which felt drought for 45 days!! “The biggest problem is the water” as Abou Waleed mentions. Scarcity in water reduces agricultural production to the half. The majority of farmers rely on precipitation to irrigate their land, since in Jordan (as in many other countries) there is no enough water to support cultivation. So how can these farmers behave after the global warming and the huge climate change in which we are living? The government has to take strong and quick measures in order to help farmers face drought.


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